Flash Fiction Competition Result

We were down to twelve, then six, getting more difficult to choose at each stage. Finding the award winners was agonising, but Caroline Jaine has made her decision, and here’s what she has to say about it:

“This was a very difficult decision, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading the stories. Flash fiction is such an inspiring and fitting genre for our times. Although many of the stories were worthy of praise, Paper Leaves stood out for me as the overall winner. The writer seemed entirely at ease with writing in this short form – there was no attempt to pack too much in, either in terms of content or vocabulary – a common mistake. Paper Leaves felt like a delicate gesture, and yet a surprisingly disturbing one – the loss of a tree, which moved me deeply. It wasn’t quite what I expected to find in such a short piece, and there lies the writer’s skill and strength.”

The final placings are:

Paper Leaves by Antonia Maxwell (UK)

Breath by Phil Arnold (Australia)

Caffeine Dreams by Vincent Wood (UK)

Read each of them, they’re worth a few minutes of your time.

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Flash Around The World

Our 2018 Flash Fiction competition has attracted entries from Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA. Thank you! Now we have the pleasure of reading all those little gems. Choosing the eventual finalists looks as if it will be as difficult as ever.

Short Story Competition opens in DecemberMeanwhile, authors can start flexing their writing muscles for our next competition, details coming in the next  few weeks. But it’ll be for short stories this time, again with no theme. Likely opening date will be December 1st with latest entries January 31st. Yes, there will be prizes.

A Wider Audience – At A Cost

Until recently Askance has tried to have all its titles available in as many forms and on as many platforms as possible, not least because giving any single outlet an exclusive right goes against the grain. Askance is inclusive, equal opportunity, and not always with money as the driving force – if that were the case we’d be long gone!

That’s changing now, and still not because of money. Because of readership. This applies particularly to ebooks. There are many ebook outlets and even wholesalers, although the world is dominated by Amazon’s Kindle with Kobo a distant second. Askance has for the most part made its ebooks available through all these outlets by using Smashwords as a wholesaler for everything but Amazon, where we’ve created our own ebooks.

But here’s the rub.

While that gives the maximum accessibility to readers worldwide, in practice it doesn’t get our titles read by so many people. Why? Because of Amazon’s aggressive tactics of making only titles which are exclusive to Kindle available via their Prime and Kindle Unlimited channels.

Is this moral? No. Do we like it? No. Is it anti-competitive? Yes. But a simple trial has shown that it gets a title read by more readers. We experimented recently and took a title off of all ebook outlets except Amazon and enrolled that title in the Unlimited program. In the first month of doing so, that book reached ten times the number of readers than it had done in the previous six months on Smashwords and Kobo. Yes, that small extra revenue (and it is small!) is welcome, but the readership is what matters most.

Are we selling our soul? It certainly doesn’t feel comfortable, but our writers deserve more readers, that’s the motivation.

The world is not as we would wish it to be.

(And if you’ve got this far and you’re a writer, please take a look at our Flash Fiction competition.)

Who’s judging the Flash Fiction competition?

Caroline Jaine

As we’ve previously announced, Askance’s founder, Caroline Jaine, will make the final selection. Although Caroline is no longer formally connected with Askance, she was delighted to accept the invitation to choose the winners from the shortlist. Caroline is an accomplished artist and writer of short and long fiction in addition to being the author of the widely acclaimed A Better Basra.

Selecting the long and short lists will be two long-time friends of Askance, both skilled in the art of storytelling.

Grace Keating

Canadian Grace Keating has written many short stories, winning  and being short-listed in competitions in the USA and the UK. Her stories have featured in two anthologies, including Askance’s Positional Vertigo.

David Wiseman – Amtraking across the USA

David Wiseman is British, although now living in Canada, and has edited Askance’s Homes and Positional Vertigo to which he also contributed. He’s also won and been shortlisted for several competitions in the UK and the USA. Askance has published three of his novels.

Mince Pies, Hot Wine & Readings at Plurabelle Books

We had a lovely evening on Tuesday.  With many thanks to Michael Cahn of Plurabelle Books for being a gracious host, Hilary Cox and Hugh Chapman for reading so well, to author DJ Wiseman for answering some tough questions and to everyone who came along – nice to meet new friends, despite the mid winter chill! Happy New Year everyone!hugh chapman

Author DJ Wiseman listens to Hugh Chapman reading from The Subtle Thief of YouthHilary Cox

Cambridge artist, Hilary Cox reading the part of Vicki Gardnerplurabelles moment bw

Text & Context?  The best Christmas tree in Cambridgeteenage fictionCaught in the act. Teenager, Billy Botha “hates books” – but Plurabelles inspired a search.